Find a Kingspan representative for your country, select from the list below.
 
 
Print page Bookmark page Email page
 
 

FAQs



We've put together some common queries that our customers often have regarding access floors and their capabilities. Click on the questions below to display the answers.

 

What is a raised access floor system?
What are the key components of a raised access floor system?
Why use a raised access floor?
Where is a raised access floor used?
What range of finished floor heights (FFH) is available?
What are stringers and why use them?
What types of surface finishes are available?
Are there any standards governing the use of raised access floors?
What about the acoustic performance of the raised access floor?
Can Kingspan Raised Access Floors be used outside?

What is a raised access floor system?

A raised access floor comprises of load bearing floor panels laid in a horizontal grid supported by adjustable vertical pedestals to provide an under floor space for the housing and distribution of services. The floor panels are readily removable to allow quick access to the under floor services.

Back to top

What are the key components of a raised access floor system?

The key components of a raised access flooring system can be defined as follows;-

Floor panel. This is the horizontal load bearing component of a raised floor. It is normally 600mm square, industry standard module size. These floor panels will be supplied as either bare finished to accept a carpet tile finish on site or, with a factory bonded finish.

Pedestal. This is the complete vertical, adjustable supporting structure to the raised floor panels. The pedestals are normally bonded to the sub floor using an adhesive with mechanical fixings if required. The pedestal assembly provides vertical adjustment.

Stringer. This is a horizontal component that connects pedestals together. It connects to the pedestal head and is used to provide additional lateral support at greater floor and/or increase the structural performance of the raised floor system.

Back to top

Why use a raised access floor?

A raised access floor provides a void below floor level which is capable of routing building services to their required destination. These services will typically include the following;

  • Electrical power
  • Data
  • Telecoms
  • HVAC; Environmental Control / Air Conditioning
  • Fire Detection and Suppression
  • Security
  • Water and Drainage.

The use of a raised access floor will allow quick and easy access to these services for maintenance reasons. Also in today’s modern office environment Churn is a major issue. Churn is the number of times that the office layout may be modified to cater for changing requirements brought about by new technology, new personnel or new tenants to a building.

Back to top

Where is a raised access floor used?

Raised access flooring is used today in a wide range of situations where there is a significant level of building services. Examples include;

  • Financial and Insurance offices where there is a need for a significant level of computer/telecom equipment.
  • National and Local Government offices, again there is a need for a significant level of computer/telecom equipment.
  • General administration buildings across the complete range of industries where the use of computer/telecom equipment is widespread.
  • Call Centres, office environment set up to handle large-scale customer enquires thereby requiring significant levels of computer/telecom equipment.
  • Data processing centres. Large scale computer rooms set up for the processing of electronic data i.e. customer information, financial information etc.
  • Telecom switch centres. Old mechanical telephone exchanges now replaced by electronic switch facilities. Also new mobile technology requires new electronic switch facilities.
  • Distribution centres. These facilities distribute a vast range of fast moving consumer goods with order processing and such activities handled in a modern office environment.
  • Educational facilities. Raised flooring used in specific learning areas in schools, universities etc. Also used in library and major archive areas.
  • Retail facilities such as major department stores increasingly using raised floors finished with special finishes.
  • Industries requiring clean room facilities such as electronic and pharmaceutical.
  • Light industrial and specialised industries where flexibility and the use of under floor services would be advantages.

Back to top

What range of finished floor heights (FFH) is available?

Using standard pedestals finished floor heights from 70mm to 1200mm are achievable. Bespoke solutions for lower and higher options are also available.

As a general rule above a finished floor height of 600mm stringers are used to provide additional lateral stability. Stringers are generally 30mm deep and as such will reduce the clear void available for services by the same dimension.

Back to top

What are stringers and why use them?

Stringers are introduced for various reasons each with their own specific design.

Snap on stringers. These snap onto the pedestal head and are used to provide additional lateral support to the raised floor. They are normally introduced at floor heights of 600mm and above. They do not increase the structural performance of the raised floor.

Bolt on stringers. These are screwed into the pedestal head and are designed as structural components and as such increase the structural performance of the raised floor system. They will also provide increased lateral stability.

It must be noted that the use of snap on or bolt on stringers will reduce the floor void depth available for service runs by about 30mm.

Back to top

What type of surface finishes are available?

The following range of surface finishes are available;-

Bare finish. Here the floor panel will not be finished with a surface covering.

Factory applied finishes. The following finishes can be supplied factory bonded to the appropriate floor panel;-

  • Vinyl
  • Static dissipative vinyl
  • Static conductive vinyl
  • Linoleum
  • High pressure laminate
  • Rubber
  • Carpet
  • Wood in various forms
  • Marble
  • Stone, ceramic tiles

Other finishes may be available after evaluation by the Kingspan Access Floors.

Back to top

Are there any standards governing the use of raised access floors?

The PSA MOB PF2 PS/SPU specification was initially produced by the Property Services Agency (PSA), one of the first large users of raised access flooring within general office areas. This document is a comprehensive performance specification covering both the products and their installation. It is based upon complete system testing i.e. floor panels supported on their pedestals. The standard has become the de facto specification for the UK raised floor industry.

With the Property Services Agency now disbanded the copyright and custodianship of the standard now resides with the Access Flooring Association.

In August 2001 a European Standard was issued after several years of consultation between all the European manufacturers and was adopted as a British Standard in November 2001, BS EN 12825. The use of this standard is increasing as it provides specifiers with increased flexibility. BSEN 12825 classifies raised flooring products by their structural performance. Installation issues are not included within BSEN 12825 so it is appropriate to consult an expert or use the National Building Specification K41.

Back to top

What about the acoustic performance of the raised access floor?

There are situations where the acoustic performance of the raised access floor is of importance with regard to its ability to dampen the transmission of airborne sound between adjoining rooms. The use of partitioning and stud wall systems mounted off the raised access floor, thus creating a clear void under partition walls does make the acoustic performance of the raised floor of significant concern in sound sensitive installations.

Product attributes
In these instances there are certain attributes of the raised access floor that become important. The construction of the floor panel with regard to the component materials is an issue with regard to the overall acoustic performance, as is the edge profile of the panel. The passage of sound between adjacent panels is dependant on the level of gap between the panels. This is dependant upon the manufactured quality of the panels and also on the quality of the raised floor installation.

Performance Considerations
An indicative performance of the acoustic properties of a raised access floor system can be derived from laboratory testing. In these tests an area of raised floor is installed within a acoustic room and a standard partition wall is constructed off the raised floor. As the acoustic performance of the room and wall are known the only variable i.e. the raised floor, can be evaluated. The transmission of airborne sound from room to room through the raised floor is measured at a range of frequencies. These measurements allow the Floor Normalised Level Difference to be determined across the test frequency range. This range of test data is brought back to a single figure known as the Weighted Floor Normalisation Level Difference that can be taken as the measurement of the amount by which the raised floor will reduce airborne noise between adjacent rooms. Generally these tests will be conducted on the raised floor alone, then with the addition of a barrier under the partition line, and then with the addition of carpet tiles on the raised floor.

Site Considerations
When required on site testing can be undertaken to determine the airborne sound transmission between adjacent rooms. However in these situations the raised floor is being measured in conjunction with the installed partitioning and the installed suspended ceiling system. Whilst each individual system e.g. raised floor, partition, ceiling may have its own test report on its acoustic performance it is difficult to determine the performance of their combined installation. Consequently in critical installations laboratory testing of a sample installation i.e. raised floor, partition, ceiling etc should be considered. Obviously the cost of testing on site can be prohibitive and in this case indicative results may be acceptable.

Back to top

Can Kingspan Raised Access Floors be used outside?

The materials involved in producing a steel encapsulated panel mean they are not suitable for outdoor use.

Back to top

 
Latest News
 

International register of interest

International register of interest

Contact us with details of your project requirement.

 
 

Contact us

Kingspan Access Floors
Burma Drive
Marfleet
Hull
HU9 5SG


Tel: +44 (0) 1482 781701
Fax: +44 (0) 1482 799272

Email International Team